20th July 1928

Born in Ickenham in the suburbs of London.

1939

11 years old when WW2 began.

1942

He left school at 14 working on farms and then in offices in London 40s His early musical career during WW2 was playing piano and bass for forces’ dances

Late 40s

Playing in a band on the Queen Mary trips to New York

50s

Living and working as a Jazz musician and sound engineer in New York

60s

Living as a painter, musician and writer in Big Sur California

Mid 60s & 70s

Back in the UK as a jazz and classical musician/ teacher and producing LPs of NY gigs

80s and 90s

Owning and managing the Bass Clef club and Wave recordings studio, Hoxton London

Mid 90s

Relaunching the Wave Records company as a portfolio of 25 CDs

90s/ 2000s

Painting around the world, playing and recording jazz, environmental and jazz writing, undertaking ceramic collection and restoration

Peter Ind - Jazz Musician

Born 20th July 1928 in Uxbridge Middlesex. U.K. English double bass player. He played on the ship the Queen Mary (1949-51) before settling in New York (1951), where he taught, and performed and recorded with Lennie Tristano (1951), Lee Konitz (1954 – 57), and Buddy Rich (1957).

He established a recording studio in 1957, and in 1961 started his own record company, Wave. His album “Looking Out” (1958-61, Wave 1) includes solos, duos with Joe Puma and the drummer Dick Scott, and tracks recorded with a trio and with a quartet. While living in Big Sur, California (1963-6), he became the first double bass player to give concerts and broadcasts as an unaccompanied soloist. In 1965 he played with Konitz and Warne Marsh. Thereafter he returned to England and continued to perform, teach and manage Wave. He toured with Konitz and Marsh in 1975-6. In 1984 he opened the Bass Clef in London, which became one of the city’s most popular clubs.

Peter Ind - Sound Engineer

In 1949 – I first visited New York. The jazz scene was at a peak of creativity. Sound recording by means of magnetic tape was new. It gave incredible advantages over the old disc recordings methods and allowed such possibilities of virtually unlimited recording time as well as such techniques as overdubbing.

In 1951 I was privileged to take part in a historic recording, when overdubbing was used for the first time in jazz improvisation (Lennie Tristano: “Passtime and JuJu”). During the early nineteen-fifties it became apparent that there was a widening split between commercial jazz and jazz that was dedicated to improvisation and experimentation.

Wave was an outgrowth of my own experimentation and my efforts to record some of the jazzmen that were extremely talented and creative, but who were not eminently successful commercially. The earlier recordings were made in New York. Since returning to the UK in 1966 I have continued recording and releasing new music in a modest way. My conviction is that Wave has added a dimension to jazz that has frequently been overlooked or marginalised.

Peter Ind - Artist

At the end of 1957 / early 1958 I went down to work in Florida with the Buddy Rich Band, and finally the temptation overtook me, because Florida was very beautiful, especially in those days, and I bought myself some oils and some pastels and went out in the Everglades and started to paint. And that was really the start of it for me.

I do have this tendency to want to paint when the fresh energy comes in after a storm, or after all the pollution has blown away. . . we would not be here today if fresh energy did not come in all the time to help clear the mess that we have made and are constantly making.

Peter Ind - Author

Peter has had a lifetime interest in creative energy, studying and writing about it.

He first wrote a study about Cosmic Metabolism and Vortical Accretion in 1964 in California.

He has concentrated on writing in the Millennium.

Peter Ind - Environmentalist

Peter periodically posts a short section from his current writing on the Environment – Letters from a Maverick: Critique of Pure Scientific Unreason: Climate Change and Pollution – are we ignoring history? And why?

Apart from the current world conflicts the concern over pollution and its apparent effect upon climate is seldom out of the news. But are we taking enough notice of evidence about past momentous climate change events to help us explain what we are facing?

What has become so clear to me over the years looking at such historical events is that there is not so much cultural ignorance but cultural avoidance of truths that do not correspond to current accepted norm. Many people blithely accept current versions of history, as though we are at the peak of culture limited by the pollution unfortunately caused merely by our super technology. We have become prisoners of our own propaganda.

Peter Ind - Ceramic Restoration

In 1949 – I first visited New York. The jazz scene was at a peak of creativity. Sound recording by means of magnetic tape was new. It gave incredible advantages over the old disc recordings methods and allowed such possibilities of virtually unlimited recording time as well as such techniques as overdubbing.

In 1951 I was privileged to take part in a historic recording, when overdubbing was used for the first time in jazz improvisation (Lennie Tristano: “Passtime and JuJu”). During the early nineteen-fifties it became apparent that there was a widening split between commercial jazz and jazz that was dedicated to improvisation and experimentation.

Wave was an outgrowth of my own experimentation and my efforts to record some of the jazzmen that were extremely talented and creative, but who were not eminently successful commercially. The earlier recordings were made in New York. Since returning to the UK in 1966 I have continued recording and releasing new music in a modest way. My conviction is that Wave has added a dimension to jazz that has frequently been overlooked or marginalised.

Peter Ind - Teacher

There are now many courses and teaching materials – for example I would recommend my good friend Rufus Reid’s course to students – especially bass players. My interest in teaching music students is, once they have put in the hard work to understand basic harmony and learn how to play on jazz standards, to help them find their own voice as jazz musicians, encouraging their confidence to open up as players and guiding them in the direction of becoming jazz artists in their own right.

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